Women of the World Wednesday: Belle Miriam Silverman (1929-2007) was born blowing  a bubble in her mouth. The doctor called  her “Bubbles,” and the nickname stuck. Beverly Sills, as she was later called, began singing professionally on the radio at the young age of 3. She performed until she was 12, and then took a break to attend Professional Children’s School in New York, where she graduated in 1945.
Beverly performed her first opera with the Philadelphia Civic Opera in 1947, as Frasquita in Bizet’s Carmen. She toured with the Charles Wagner Opera Company in the early 1950s, and went on to sign with New York City Opera in 1955, first performing as Roslindale in Die Fledermaus. 
In 1956 Beverly married Peter B. Greenborough, the associate editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. She became a stepmother to his three children. The couple also had a son and a daughter of their own children. Both children were diagnosed with serious health complications, and Beverly took a break from the stage to care for her children. In addition to her singing career, she went on to devote herself to charities such as the March of Dimes, and she was the national chairperson for that organization’s “Mother’s March” on Birth Defects.
Beverly was known for her ability to embody the roles she played as an opera singer. Julius Rudel, the New York City Opera director, kept this in mind when he successfully convinced her to return to the stage. In 1966, in a rival opening night performance with the Metropolitan Opera Company, Beverly succeeded brilliantly as Cleopatra in Julius Caesar.
It was in 1968 that Beverly gave the performance for which she is probably most well-known, appearing as the title role in Massenet’s Manon, one of her signature roles.
Beverly Sills continued to perform throughout the 70s, and announced her retirement during a televised concert. She went on to hold administrative roles at the Met, Lincoln Center, and the City Opera. President Jimmy Carter awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980.
Source: Healy, John David. “Beverly Sills.” Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives, Thematic Series: Sports Figures. Ed. Arnold Markoe and Kenneth T. Jackson. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2003. Biography in Context. Web. 2 July 2014.
Image Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Daniel A.P. Murray Pamphlets Collection.

Women of the World Wednesday: Belle Miriam Silverman (1929-2007) was born blowing  a bubble in her mouth. The doctor called  her “Bubbles,” and the nickname stuck. Beverly Sills, as she was later called, began singing professionally on the radio at the young age of 3. She performed until she was 12, and then took a break to attend Professional Children’s School in New York, where she graduated in 1945.

Beverly performed her first opera with the Philadelphia Civic Opera in 1947, as Frasquita in Bizet’s Carmen. She toured with the Charles Wagner Opera Company in the early 1950s, and went on to sign with New York City Opera in 1955, first performing as Roslindale in Die Fledermaus.

In 1956 Beverly married Peter B. Greenborough, the associate editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. She became a stepmother to his three children. The couple also had a son and a daughter of their own children. Both children were diagnosed with serious health complications, and Beverly took a break from the stage to care for her children. In addition to her singing career, she went on to devote herself to charities such as the March of Dimes, and she was the national chairperson for that organization’s “Mother’s March” on Birth Defects.

Beverly was known for her ability to embody the roles she played as an opera singer. Julius Rudel, the New York City Opera director, kept this in mind when he successfully convinced her to return to the stage. In 1966, in a rival opening night performance with the Metropolitan Opera Company, Beverly succeeded brilliantly as Cleopatra in Julius Caesar.

It was in 1968 that Beverly gave the performance for which she is probably most well-known, appearing as the title role in Massenet’s Manon, one of her signature roles.

Beverly Sills continued to perform throughout the 70s, and announced her retirement during a televised concert. She went on to hold administrative roles at the Met, Lincoln Center, and the City Opera. President Jimmy Carter awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980.

Source: Healy, John David. “Beverly Sills.” Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives, Thematic Series: Sports Figures. Ed. Arnold Markoe and Kenneth T. Jackson. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2003. Biography in Context. Web. 2 July 2014.

Image Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Daniel A.P. Murray Pamphlets Collection.

Meet the Intern: Jacob 
Hey, my name is Jacob! I am a high school student going into my senior year. I currently live in the California Bay Area. I am a participant in the National Leadership Council (NLC) which is a 4 year Christian Science leadership program.
I have gone on trips every summer since freshman year including trips to Colorado, Canada, and Peru. I am currently in Boston for 3 weeks doing an internship with The First Church of Christ, Scientist’s youth community department (TMC Youth). I am a very passionate individual and am very interested in digital media, including filmmaking and photography. I had a huge interest in photography and was teaching myself Final Cut Pro (a professional editing software) when I was 12 years old.
Here at TMC Youth I am in charge of various video projects and am having a ton of fun! I have been doing freelance video projects for years now for different companies and my experience at TMC Youth is definitely one to remember. I have been able to use their nice film equipment and have been given a lot of creative freedom to create whatever I consider would look good. I came here to Boston in hopes to further my filmmaking journey and can definitely say that my internship with TMC Youth has further helped me in learning everything it takes to become a filmmaker. I look forward to my last week here in Boston and am very thankful for having this opportunity.

Meet the Intern: Jacob 

Hey, my name is Jacob! I am a high school student going into my senior year. I currently live in the California Bay Area. I am a participant in the National Leadership Council (NLC) which is a 4 year Christian Science leadership program.

I have gone on trips every summer since freshman year including trips to Colorado, Canada, and Peru. I am currently in Boston for 3 weeks doing an internship with The First Church of Christ, Scientist’s youth community department (TMC Youth). I am a very passionate individual and am very interested in digital media, including filmmaking and photography. I had a huge interest in photography and was teaching myself Final Cut Pro (a professional editing software) when I was 12 years old.

Here at TMC Youth I am in charge of various video projects and am having a ton of fun! I have been doing freelance video projects for years now for different companies and my experience at TMC Youth is definitely one to remember. I have been able to use their nice film equipment and have been given a lot of creative freedom to create whatever I consider would look good. I came here to Boston in hopes to further my filmmaking journey and can definitely say that my internship with TMC Youth has further helped me in learning everything it takes to become a filmmaker. I look forward to my last week here in Boston and am very thankful for having this opportunity.

Mapparium Monday: My Favorite Quote in the Mapparium Show
By: Brittany White
Out of all of the quotes in the Mapparium, this one has always been my favorite for some reason. I think it’s an incredibly simple but powerful statement and I had always admired Eleanor Roosevelt for her courage and determination to make her voice heard, but honestly I never knew the historical context of the quote. 
Upon researching it, I discovered that this quote was part of a speech she gave on the radio on Nov. 11, 1951 right as the country was fighting a war with Korea. Hearing this context made me realize even more just how powerful this statement is. 1951 was clearly a time of war and violence in the country and Eleanor was trying to persuade us to look to peace instead of violence. 
However, what is very important about this quote is that she realizes that as much as we might want peace, it cannot be achieved unless we fully believe in it. If we only half-heartedly want peace, then we will never be able to achieve it. She also understands that we must take it one step further once we do have that belief that peace is not easy to achieve. To achieve it takes work and effort and results may not happen overnight, but if we really want to attain this peace, we will do the work and will see the rewards. 
I think this quote is one that can be applied to any time period; peace is not something restricted to a certain era, and is this versatility that makes it my favorite Mapparium quote.
Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, by Carl Van Vechten,  Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, LC-DIG-hec-46848

Mapparium Monday: My Favorite Quote in the Mapparium Show

By: Brittany White

Out of all of the quotes in the Mapparium, this one has always been my favorite for some reason. I think it’s an incredibly simple but powerful statement and I had always admired Eleanor Roosevelt for her courage and determination to make her voice heard, but honestly I never knew the historical context of the quote.

Upon researching it, I discovered that this quote was part of a speech she gave on the radio on Nov. 11, 1951 right as the country was fighting a war with Korea. Hearing this context made me realize even more just how powerful this statement is. 1951 was clearly a time of war and violence in the country and Eleanor was trying to persuade us to look to peace instead of violence.

However, what is very important about this quote is that she realizes that as much as we might want peace, it cannot be achieved unless we fully believe in it. If we only half-heartedly want peace, then we will never be able to achieve it. She also understands that we must take it one step further once we do have that belief that peace is not easy to achieve. To achieve it takes work and effort and results may not happen overnight, but if we really want to attain this peace, we will do the work and will see the rewards.

I think this quote is one that can be applied to any time period; peace is not something restricted to a certain era, and is this versatility that makes it my favorite Mapparium quote.

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, by Carl Van Vechten,  Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, LC-DIG-hec-46848